Edison High School Green Campus

This multi-year project transformed Thomas Edison High School in Northeast Minneapolis into a new model of green infrastructure.

Overview

The new parking lot at Edison High School includes a tree trench, permeable pavers and a raingarden.

Underground storage tanks hold captured stormwater runoff for irrigating the athletic field.

A "before" photo of the plaza at Edison High School.

The reconstructed plaza. Future additions will include a new parking lot and solar panels.

MWMO Board Chair Kevin Reich (left) and Minnesota Vikings Executive Vice-President Lester Bagley (center) at the ribbon cutting for the school’s new athletic field in 2015.

Project Details

City: Minneapolis

Type: Capital Project Grant

Status: Completed

MWMO Funding: $1.7 million

Partners: Minneapolis Public Schools; Holland Neighborhood Improvement Association; Edison High School; NFL Foundation & Local Initiatives Support Corporation; Spark-Y; Stantec; St. Paul Utilities; Sheehy Construction; Lazor Office; AWH Architects; Wetland Habitat Restorations

Staff Contact:
Marcy Bean, PLA
Capital Projects and Stewardship Specialist
612-746-4979
Email Marcy Bean, PLA
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This multi-phase project is transforming Thomas Edison High School in Northeast Minneapolis into a model “green campus,” with state-of-the-art stormwater and energy-efficiency features.

Highlights of the green campus improvements include:

  • A stormwater re-use system will store up to 110,900 gallons of captured rainwater, which will be used to irrigate the new athletic field.
  • The school’s redesigned parking lot can capture and treat more than 47,000 gallons of polluted stormwater runoff at a time.
  • A “solar canopy” over the plaza will generate enough energy to power up to 53 homes per year, offsetting 40 percent of the school’s electricity needs.
  • A new community garden and greenhouse will provide hands-on learning opportunities for students.

In total, the stormwater features at Edison are projected to capture and treat an estimated 1.5 million gallons of runoff each year that would have otherwise drained to the Mississippi River. In addition, they have been designed in such a way as to be incorporated into the school’s academic programming. An IB biology class at Edison is already using the stormwater treatments in its curriculum.